Lopressor and Norvasc drug interactions - from FDA reports


Drug interactions are reported among people who take Lopressor and Norvasc together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Lopressor and Norvasc. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 2,879 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly.



On Jun, 29, 2018

2,879 people who take Lopressor, Norvasc are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Lopressor and Norvasc drug interactions.

Most common drug interactions over time *:

< 1 month:
  1. Blood creatinine increased
  2. Abscess (pus)
  3. Exostosis (formation of new bone on the surface of a bone)
  4. International normalised ratio increased
  5. Localised infection (infection at the single location)
1 - 6 months:
  1. Anastomotic complication (complication of surgical connection between two structures)
  2. Gastroenteritis viral (inflammation of stomach and intestine caused by virus infection)
  3. Haematoma (collection of blood outside the blood vessels)
  4. Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)
  5. Urinary tract infection
6 - 12 months:
  1. Angina pectoris (chest pain due to ischemia of the heart muscle)
  2. Cardiac disorder
  3. Cardiac failure congestive
  4. Heart rate increased
  5. Orthostatic hypotension (a medical condition consisting of a sudden decrease in blood pressure when a person stands up)
1 - 2 years:
  1. Cardiac failure congestive
  2. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (involves fibrosis of skin, joints, eyes due to kidney disease)
  3. Anxiety
  4. Depression
  5. Emotional distress
2 - 5 years:
  1. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  2. Cough
  3. Ventricular extrasystoles (premature cardiac contraction)
  4. Contusion (a type of hematoma of tissue in which capillaries)
  5. Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle)
5 - 10 years:
  1. Shoulder pain
  2. Acute myocardial infarction (acute heart attack)
  3. Angiodysplasia (small vascular malformation of the gut)
  4. Blood disorder
  5. Congestive cardiomyopathy (weakening of heart muscle)
10+ years:
  1. Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle)
  2. Osteonecrosis (death of bone)
  3. Paraesthesia (sensation of tingling, tickling, prickling, pricking, or burning of a person's skin with no apparent long-term physical effect)
  4. Periodontitis (inflammation of the tissue around the teeth)
  5. Squamous cell carcinoma (a cancer of a kind of epithelial cell)
not specified:
  1. Pain
  2. Anxiety
  3. Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle)
  4. Chest pain
  5. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)

Most common drug interactions by gender *:

female:
  1. Injury
  2. Cardiac failure congestive
  3. Diarrhoea
  4. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  5. Fall
male:
  1. Pain
  2. Anxiety
  3. Drug ineffective
  4. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  5. Asthenia (weakness)

Most common drug interactions by age *:

2-9:
  1. Confusional state
  2. Constipation
  3. Contusion (a type of hematoma of tissue in which capillaries)
  4. Fall
  5. Feeling abnormal
10-19:
  1. Abnormal weight gain
  2. Administration site pain
  3. Adverse reaction
  4. Anhedonia (inability to experience pleasure from activities usually found enjoyable)
  5. Anxiety
20-29:
  1. Pain
  2. Anxiety
  3. Emotional distress
  4. Injury
  5. Proteinuria (presence of protein in the urine)
30-39:
  1. Pain
  2. Cardiac failure congestive
  3. Hypercholesterolaemia (high levels of cholesterol in the blood)
  4. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  5. Polydipsia (excessive thirst)
40-49:
  1. Pain
  2. Chest pain
  3. Anxiety
  4. Injury
  5. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
50-59:
  1. Pain
  2. Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle)
  3. Anxiety
  4. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  5. Chest pain
60+:
  1. Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle)
  2. Injury
  3. Chest pain
  4. Renal failure (kidney dysfunction)
  5. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

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Related studies

Lopressor

Lopressor has active ingredients of metoprolol tartrate. It is often used in high blood pressure. (latest outcomes from Lopressor 25,783 users)

Norvasc

Norvasc has active ingredients of amlodipine besylate. It is often used in high blood pressure. (latest outcomes from Norvasc 105,684 users)


Interactions between Lopressor and drugs from A to Z
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Interactions between Norvasc and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Browse all drug interactions of Lopressor and Norvasc
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

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NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered.

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